Bio-Individuality™

Bio-Individuality™ the concept that each of us has unique food and lifestyle needs. One person’s food is another person’s poison, and that’s why fad diets tend to fail in the long run. Working on the principle of bio-individuality, I’ll support you to make positive changes that are based on your unique needs, lifestyle, preferences, and ancestral background.

What does “healthy” food mean to you? Is it raw? Plant based? Low fat? Low sugar? “Clean?” The answer could be different for everyone—and according to Integrative Nutrition’s core concept of bio-individuality, it wouldn’t be wrong either.

In an extensive story published in July of 2016, the New York Times showed a shocking discrepancy in opinion.

For instance, 71% of the public interviewed considered a granola bar to be a healthy snack, while only 28% of nutritionists agreed. On the other hand, 90% of nutritionists gave their approval of hummus, compared to only 66% of the public. The inconsistency here is understandable from a nutritionist’s perspective—a granola bar often contains a large amount of added sugars that the average consumer may be unaware of, an issue of misinformation the FDA is hoping to remedy through new nutrition labels that require added sugars to be listed. And hummus, a traditional Middle Eastern chickpea and tahini-based spread that’s rich in protein, only gained popularity in the United States in the last five years or so, the Washington Post reported.

Even nutritionists couldn’t agree on the health status of certain foods, including cheddar cheese and popcorn, which where approved by only 57% and 61%, respectively.

This article shed light on how different the concept of eating healthy is to each person, even experts in nutrition. As Health Coaches, our job is to help our clients find the way of eating that makes them feel satisfied and energetic, whether that means a vegan diet, a Mediterranean diet, or a little of everything in moderation.

There is no one size fits all diet. It simply does not exist.

Read the full New York Times article here.